How to destroy the future | Noam Chomsky | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

This article has haunted me since I’ve read it. It’s terrifying.

How to destroy the future | Noam Chomsky | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk.

Advertisements

This and that

Companies being disgusting:
Baby health crisis in Indonesia as formula companies push products | World news | The Guardian.

Food giants still flouting code on promoting baby milk formula in developing countries | Business | The Observer.

This was why my university banned all Nestle products on campus, Nestle having infamously promoted baby milk formula in Africa, causing infant mortality rates to RISE.

Eight top fashion retailers fail to sign Bangladesh safety accord | Business | The Guardian.

Ethical shopping: how the high street fashion stores rate | Lucy Siegle | Fashion | The Guardian.

Food:

BBC News – Using tree food recipes to fight off malnutrition.

India's rice revolution | Global development | The Observer.

Funny:

Sats girl takes Michael Gove, the comma chameleon, to task | Politics | The Guardian.

The 10 best words the internet has given English | Books | guardian.co.uk.

Never again

It has been 65 years of dispossession. Thousands of Palestinians in Israel march to return | The Electronic Intifada

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who fought apartheid in South Africa, on apartheid and the power of disinvestment in Occupied Palestine: 

Tutu: Issue is the same in Palestine as it was in South Africa, ‘equality’ | Mondoweiss.

I believe in disinvestment and the BDS movement. This is why I don’t buy Marks & Spencers, I don’t go to Starbucks, I don’t buy anything that’s either made in Israel or is from Israel. I don’t really tell people about this, because people think it’s a “Muslim thing” (that Bethlehem and Jerusalem are occupied doesn’t seem to occur to people… Seriously. WHAT WOULD JESUS DO? Ignoring those who are being oppressed doesn’t seem to be it!), people think it’s pathetic/ useless, people just generally think it’s weird. But really, I am much more answerable to God than anyone else, and even if I can’t do much other than stop buying those tasty Israeli persimmons and stop drinking nice cold coffees in those pretty tumblers, at least I am aware, and I am doing something. At least I know enough to decide how I want to spend my money matters, because it matters to me. What I consume, what I buy, is a decision that shapes me, and it’s in the little things that I don’t let slip by that make me more aware, more concerned of things that are happening to people other than me.

“To those who wrongly accuse you of unfairness or harm done to them by this call for divestment, I suggest, with humility, that the harm suffered from being confronted with opinions that challenge one’s own pales in comparison to the harm done by living a life under occupation and daily denial of basic rights and dignity. It is not with rancor that we criticize the Israeli government, but with hope, a hope that a better future can be made for both Israelis and Palestinians, a future in which both the violence of the occupier and the resulting violent resistance of the occupied come to an end, and where one people need not rule over another, engendering suffering, humiliation, and retaliation. True peace must be anchored in justice and an unwavering commitment to universal rights for all humans, regardless of ethnicity, religion, gender, national origin or any other identity attribute. – Archbishop Desmond Tutu”

We’ve got our hearts on safe

I woke up today filled with a strange sort of grief that I was here and this is now, for no clear reason other than today, I read something about an old friend that showed me how far away her life was from mine, and how we both were so far away from the people we used to be.

So today, I choose to focus on things that make me, if not quite happy, then, at least, grateful.

This is beautiful:
Bi Kidude obituary | Music | The Guardian

These are defiant, in a “Well, we’re on the brink already” kind of way:

BBC News – How flash mob flamenco took on the banks.

In Spain they are all indignados nowadays | Katharine Ainger | Comment is free | The Guardian.

This is deeply, deeply moving:

Utøya massacre survivors: ‘I bear my scars with dignity’ – in pictures | Art and design | The Observer.

I want to be this photographer’s friend:

BBC News – The fashion world’s silver stylistas.

Also, I watched Lincoln, which I genuinely enjoyed, but I found the character I was most interested in to be Thaddeus Stevens played by Tommy Lee Jones. He seems to have been a man who truly tried to live by his beliefs. Wonder when we’ll get a movie about him.

She’s really most sincerely dead

So, am not a fan of Margaret Thatcher, or David Cameron, or Tories, or greedy, gawping, grasping people.

This, this is just damn sad.

Margaret Thatcher’s funeral: 23 things you could pay for with £10m | News | guardian.co.uk.

This lady is pretty kick-ass. Even though she’s Labour. I’m more of a Green/ SNP/ independent kind of girl, myself.

Glenda Jackson on the death of Margaret Thatcher: “I had to speak out to stop history being re-written” – UK Politics – UK – The Independent.

This is pretty funny:

Anti-Thatcher song “Ding Dong the Witch is Dead” misses top spot in Radio 1 charts – News – Music – The Independent.

“Wake up – sleepy head, rub your eyes, get out of bed.
Wake up, the Wicked Witch is dead.”

Best articles on the Boston bombing so far…

“Is that what “terrorism” is? “When multiple (explosive) devices go off”? If so, that encompasses a great many things, including what the US does in the world on a very regular basis. Of course, the quest to know whether this was “terrorism” is really code for: “was this done by Muslims”?”

The Boston bombing produces familiar and revealing reactions | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

“What made them suspect him? He was running—so was everyone. The bystander handed the man to the police, who reportedly thought he smelled like explosives; his wounds might have suggested why. He said something about thinking there would be a second bomb—as there was, and often is, to target responders. If that was the reason he gave for running, it was a sensible one. He asked if anyone was dead—a question people were screaming. And he was from Saudi Arabia, which is around where the logic stops. Was it just the way he looked, or did he, in the chaos, maybe call for God with a name that someone found strange?”

The Saudi Marathon Man : The New Yorker

And less depressingly, this

Inspiring Images From Boston – Business Insider

and this:

To Boston. From Kabul. With Love. – Principle Pictures.